Social Distancing: Grief & Mourning the Loss of Normalcy

Social distancing–hate it, love it, the reality means we grieve the loss of normalcy. A kind of “little death” that doesn’t rise to the level of true loss (until it does, when someone we know dies). Yet all the emotions seem familiar.

stages of social distancingI suspect most readers are familiar with the Kubler-Ross stages of grief and mourning: denial, anger, depression, bargaining, and acceptance. They affect us when we lose a beloved family member, including our cats and dogs. These stages can happen in any order, at different rates of speed for each individual.

Social Distancing: Grief & Mourning the Loss of Normalcy

During this time of change, uncertainty, and worldwide upheaval, many of us also now experience a cascade of unexpected emotion. No, it’s not on the same scale as losing a special pet, or a beloved human family member. But I believe many of the emotional reactions we see occur as individuals work through grief and mourn the loss of the world we knew.

stages of social distancing

The Five Stages Of Social Distancing

DENIAL

“This can’t happen,” we argue. The gut-punch of shock, like a fist, leaves us numb. Disbelief and denial quickly follow. We study the reports, question the experts, looking for something that supports our greatest wish–that this all just GO AWAY!

Some decry overreactions or label news as fake. Conspiracy theories take the place of common sense. Denying reality helps push away or dull the fear, offering emotional protection from the prospect of overwhelming despair. Fear vanquishes common sense if you let it.

Because folks, I don’t know about you, but I’m scared. And struggling. So then Bravo tries to climb into my lap (all 125+ pounds of him), and I have to laugh. I’m incredibly grateful that the COVID-19 virus doesn’t affect cats and dogs, based on these expert tests. And the fear subsides for long enough to take a breath and make sense of the senseless.

stages of social distancing

ANGER

Normal frustration easily erupts in anger. Finger-pointing and the blame-game turn decent people into unrecognizable trolls. Those folks at high risk as well as those health care workers, grocery employees, truckers, and others on the front lines feel discounted or underappreciated.

Some nay-sayers allow fear to keep them stuck in the quagmire of denial. Confusion over accurate information, and losing control over our lives, create situations ripe for fear aggression—the worst kind in animal companions (and in humans!), that lashes out without thought for consequences.

Have patience. It’s normal to get angry. Shout, scream, vent. Cry. Hit a pillow.

Then…BREATHE. When this happens with me, Karma-Kat insists on lap snuggles. How’d he know that I needed that?

stages of social distancing

BARGAINING

We rail against fate to bargain away the situation (“I’ll wash my hands, wear a mask, and stay six feet away if you don’t cancel my Las Vegas trip, church service, music festival, anniversary gathering, dog show, writer’s conference…). Social distancing demands we adhere to all recommendations. We can’t pick and choose.

So when that doesn’t work, we buy up talismans (TP anyone?) to protect us from the uncertain future. Because shitake happens.

stages of social distancing

DEPRESSION

The pain of loss hits hard once the initial shock goes away. Individuals have forever lost special Senior Year events. Students and working artists can’t perform after spending weeks and thousands of dollars creating and rehearsing. Dream jobs go away, life savings evaporate, vacation plans and professional events disappear like summer rain on hot Texas pavement. Layoffs, cut hours, canceled appointments turn income if-y. We second-guess what we shoulda-coulda-woulda done before chaos took over our life.

Social isolation can and will create loneliness. But we can make it a time to remember the past and reflect on the good times. Also, make it a time to reach out—virtually—to others who share these same feelings, to fight any feelings of depression, emptiness or despair. Use phones to text, Facetime, talk, and connect with each other. Schedule Skype meals to share virtually across the planet.

Adopt or foster a pet in need–the ongoing crisis could increase pet deaths if/when shelters are forced to shut down. If you’re home now during the day, a foster cat or dog could save you both from depression.

Treasure your own pets and family. Connect to protect yourselves and each other.

stages of social distancing

ACCEPTANCE

Most of us aren’t here yet, but the last stage of grief brings us acceptance to deal with the long-term reality of this situation. It’s also a time to think about the future—finding practical financial and other solutions to the problems we’ll face both during this time of the pandemic, and in the changing world on the other side of isolation.

Ultimately, we can hope for a return to normalcy—maybe not exactly what we knew before, but a new normal. And, dare I pray, one that’s filled with unexpected blessings forged from the fire of our shared experiences.

Now, I’ve got to go count my furry blessings. Bravo-Dawg and Karma-Kat remind me every day of the joy in each moment. And so do you, dear readers. Connect to protect, and stay safe and well.

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Comments

Social Distancing: Grief & Mourning the Loss of Normalcy — 6 Comments

  1. Amy thank you so much for this post and it is spot on. Last night while watching Rachel Maddow I became so overcome by fear it was unreal. I am limiting my TV exposure to local news for things I MUST know. I am most fearful of friends/family becoming ill than anything else. Thankfully, I lead a boring life to begin with so being at home isn’t unusual for me. That part isn’t a huge adjustment. It’s feeling like I can’t go freely anywhere………there is no place to go……..the grocery stores are still empty…….those things scare me. This is our new “normal” probably at LEAST through the summer………..I feel like we are all a part of some scary movie. Praying we all stay healthy, and yes thank COD for our Pets. Cody has been extra cuddly, I think he KNOWS I need it! Sending you love and wishes for good health!

    • Oh Caren, HUGS from afar! And yes, it’s dang scary. Both of my furry wonders have been extra cuddly. Yes, they do react to our feelings of stress. Praying for all of this to pass quickly, and the safety of all.

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