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How to Prepare for a Disaster: Pet Preparedness & Tips

by | Sep 29, 2022 | Emergency Help | 2 comments

Ask Amy Shojai: How & Why To Ma...
Ask Amy Shojai: How & Why To Make Your Dog or Cat Vomit in Case of Emergency

With the latest hurricane and more on the way, it’s time to revisit your pet disaster plan. You do have one, right? After Katrina and Harvey, everyone should understand the importance of disaster preparation.

I posted this in June for National Pet Preparedness Month. September is Disaster Preparation Month. Hurricane Ian drives home the importance of having a disaster plan not only for yourself when Mother Nature throws a tantrum but also to keep your pets safe. Whether you must deal with tornadoes, floods, landslides, typhoons, wildfires, or other emergencies, there’s a rule that we must always PLAN FOR THE WORST.

And then pray it doesn’t happen. For those going through issues now, refer to these resources:

Florida Animal Shelter Emergency Response
  • Mobile Phone: 941-525-8035.
  • Office Phone: 863-577-4605.
  • Email: sthayer@spcaflorida.org.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE:

Florida Animal Shelter Emergency Response

American Humane Red Star Disaster Response

American Red Cross

Disaster Assistance and Emergency Relief (Government)

Fire fighter saving cat

ref=”https://amyshojai.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Depositphotos_18364567_l.jpg”> Bucharest, Romania – October 2, 2012: A fire fighter holds a cat, after saving it from a burning block of flats in Bucharest. — Photo Copr bizoon/DepositPhotos.com[/ca

Disaster Preparation: Are You Disaster Ready?

A Pet360.com survey revealed 13% of pet owners had been through a disaster or evacuation with pets, and of those, 12% had been separated from their fur-kids. I don’t know about you, but I’d go CRAZY if I was separated from Shadow-Pup or Karma-Kat at such a time! Other findings:

  • 46% do not have an emergency plan in place for their pets.
  • Of those who do have a plan, only 40% practice it with their pets.
  • Less than 35% have an emergency kit for their pets.
  • 63% do not have Pet Alert stickers in their windows.

disaster preparation

TOP TIPS FOR PET DISASTER PREPARATION PLANS

Watch news and weather reports. When weather turns ify, bring all pets into the house so that you won’t have to search for them. Make sure all dogs and cats are wearing collars and up-to-date identification. If you have nothing else handy, use a felt-tip marker and write your phone number and name on the pet’s tummy.

Designate a “safe room” in the house to confine pets until the all clear. Many homes in North Texas don’t have basements or storm cellars. An internal room without windows, often a bathroom without windows, can be a good option. At my house, the cat gets stuffed into cat carriers and placed inside the pantry situated under the stairs. It’s big enough that the humans and Bravo can fit inside, too.

Teach pets NOW to go to their “safe room” by practicing and rewarding with tasty treats, favorite games or anything that really floats their boat. Cats often hide during strange weather so make sure you have a way to find them.

DISASTER PREPARATION PLANS FOR EVACUATION!

If you must evacuate, take your pets along. It may be days before authorities allow you to return home.

Red Cross shelters currently prohibit pets, except for certified service animals. In the wake of the Katrina deluge, efforts are underway to make some changes that accommodate furry family members. Until/unless those changes come about, if you’ve got to evacuate, find a hotel, friend, or other accommodations in advance that will let you bring your dogs and cats. Hotels that ordinarily prohibit pets may make exceptions during times of emergency evacuations so always ask.

disaster preparation

SAKON NAKHON, THAILAND – JULY 29, 2017 : Young man moving dogs with boat from flood water.

6 Tips for Pet Disaster Preparation

  • Attach the phone number and address of your temporary shelter, if you know it, to the pet’s collar tags. You can buy temporary tags or put adhesive tape on the back of your pet’s ID tag, adding information with an indelible pen. Write directly on a flat nylon collar or halter to make it easy for a stranger to read the information.
  • Have a pet evacuation emergency kit handy that contains pet food, medications, cat litter, vaccination/health certificates and veterinary contact information. You may need proof of vaccination to be admitted to shelters. Be sure your kit contains a three-day supply of all the pet essentials. If easily packed, take an extra towel or blanket for each pet. Don’t forget sturdy leashes, harnesses, carriers or X-pens for safe confinement.
  • Most facilities will require your cats and dogs to be under your control, and may also require proof of current vaccination. Include a favorite comfort toy or treat, the pet’s food and can opener if needed, and don’t forget water—one quart per cat-size pet per day (more for big dogs) is a good rule of paw. One of the pheromone spray products such as Comfort Zone/DAP for dogs or Feliway for cats can help relieve the stress of being in a strange environment.
  • Have plenty of plastic bags and newspapers as well as containers and cleaning supplies tfirst-aido help deal with pet waste. Puppy training pads or Depends undergarments work well.
  • Prepare for the unthinkable, too. Include current photos of your pets in case they get lost, and bring a first-aid kit to care for possible injuries. Include disposable latex gloves, sterile dressings, antibiotic towelettes and ointment, eyewash, thermometer, and any prescription medications your pets need. You can find more specifics in “The First-Aid Companion For Dogs & Cats.”
  • Your evacuation kit should also include a cell phone, flashlight, extra batteries, battery powered radio, map of area, whistle/air horn to signal for help, and matches in a waterproof container. Keep a list of emergency numbers with your phone, including a pet emergency clinic number and shelters that may temporarily house animals. Keep your car tank filled with at least half a tank at all times.

DISASTER PREPARATION ORGANIZATIONS FOR PETS

Be ready for Mother Nature’s “what if” surprises now and prepare for the worst. I pray you’ll never need this information.

Have you ever gone through a disaster or evacuation with your pets? What do you wish you’d known or would do differently? Please share!

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I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered? Do you have a new kitten and need answers? NOTE: Some links to books or other products may be to affiliates, from which I may earn a small percentage of sales, but I do not recommend anything unless I feel it would benefit readers. Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, and sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways and appearances related to my September Day pet-centric THRILLERS WITH BITE!

2 Comments

  1. Judi

    Thx for the write up Amy. We stayed here in Leland NC (next to Wilmington) during Hurricane Matthew CAT 1 and even those winds and trying to let our Ch Airedale (15 yrs old) out to potty was very difficult and that was right next to house and outside the door. Then Hurricane Florence hit us in 2018. Guinness had passed by then and the Eye was right one us. 30″ of rain.We left to family nr Atlanta but a neighbor stayed – with 9 people and 9 pets and no power. I know the neighbors right by me had cared for their pets but I’m sure many in Wilmington did not. Hopefully your article will bring to mind the necessity of planning. AND thank you to all those people who can volunteer to rescue and care for disaster affected animals – large and small. I wish I were younger and better health to help so can only do so financially. Everyone please take heed.

    • Amy Shojai

      Yes, planning makes all the difference! Thanks for your reminder, Judi.

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  1. Katrina Revisited: Hurricane Harvey Disaster PreparationAMY SHOJAI'S Bling, Bitches & Blood - […] of the storm. Please tell me you’re disaster ready, both you and your pets! Read more about disaster preparation…
  2. What to Do for Fire Hazards & Pet Smoke InhalationAMY SHOJAI'S Bling, Bitches & Blood - […] wrote about disaster preparation on the blog back in August to address hurricane issues, but now another disaster with…

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