FIGHT OR FLIGHT: Thriller Preorder & Thriller Paperback Give Away!

I’m excited to announce the release of my newest thriller FIGHT OR FLIGHT.  You got to vote for the NAME THAT PET contest and now the book is finally here! The thriller preorder is now available at a discount, so you can get the story at $2.99 until release day on July 31st when the price goes up to $4.99.

Want a paw-tographed PRINT copy of the book? Scroll on down for your chance to win!
fight or flight thriller preorder give away

FIGHT OR FLIGHT: Available on Ebooks Everywhere!

Get FIGHT OR FLIGHT on Kindle here

Get FIGHT OR FLIGHT on Nook here

Get FIGHT OR FLIGHT on iBooks here

Get FIGHT OR FLIGHT on Kobo here

Get FIGHT OR FLIGHT on GooglePlay here

A THRILLER PREORDER FAVOR?

THANK YOU to those who have “followed” me on my BookBub page, a site that keeps track of promotions and sends out announcements about ever 6 months or so (or sooner if I have a new book). I need only a few more followers to qualify and send out a preorder announcement for FIGHT OR FLIGHT so I would love for y’all to do me a favor, even if you don’t enter the contest or preorder the book.

CLICK and follow me on BookBub here.

WIN BLING & A THRILLER PAPERBACK GIVE AWAY

I’m giving away THREE (3) paw-tographed copies of FIGHT OR FLIGHT along with a rhinestone paw jewelry set. Enter for you chance to win, below. Remember, the more you share, the better your chances to be one of the winners!

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. NOTE: Bling, Bitches & Blood sometimes shares affiliate links to products that may help you with your pets, but we only share what we feel is appropriate.

Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered? Do you have a new kitten and need answers? Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, and sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways and appearances related to my September Day pet-centric THRILLERS WITH BITE!

Pet First Aid Medicine Chest: Home Remedies to Save Pet Lives

Do you have a pet 1st aid medicine chest for your dogs and cats? While your veterinarian diagnoses and prescribes for your pet’s health issues, pet first aid as well as minor problems may benefit from human medicines. Let’s face it, home remedies for pets save $$ and pet lives because Fido and Sheba rarely tears a claw or eats something ify during regular clinic hours. It’s helpful to know how to use your pantry supplies and human medicine chest to help your cat or dog. Some people prescriptions can be dangerous (especially for cats!) so it’s a good idea to have a handy list.

kitten first aid

Image Copr. Amy Shojai, CABC

Pet First Aid Medicine Chest

First aid and home remedies don’t replace proper veterinary care, but they can keep pets more comfy until medical care is available. And sometimes a home remedy is all that’s needed. Even if human meds work, the doses usually are lower due to the smaller size of the pet.

When you’re faced with an emergency, time matters. It’s best to put together your own pet first aid medicine chest with the medicine and care products you’ll need. Fortunately, many of these items can be found in your own medicine chest. Your vet can tell you the exact dose needed for your specific pet but here are some common human medicines that benefit pets.

27 Common Human Medicines for Pets

  •  A & D Ointment: antibacterial for scrapes and wounds.
  • Artificial Tears: eye lubricant
  • Aveeno Oatmeal Bath: soothing rinse for itchy skin
  • Benadryl: antihistamine for bug bites—also makes pets sleepy
  • Betadine: antiseptic for cleansing/soaking wounds or injuries
  • Burow’s solution: topical antiseptic (great for hot spots!)
  • Caladryl: soothing topical for pain or itching
  • Cortaid: anti-itch cream
  • Desitin: for skin inflammation
  • Dramamine: helpful for car sickness, nausea
  • Dulcolax: for constipation
  • Epsom salts: for soothing soak for sore paws
  • Ginger Snaps cookies for car sickness
  • Kaopectate: to control diarrhea
  • Lanacane: topical anesthetic
  • Massengill Disposable Douche: body odor/skunk spray
  • Metamucil (unflavored): for constipation
  • Mylanta Liquid: for digestive problems and/or gas
  • Neosporin: to help prevent wound infection (helpful for tail injuries)
  • Pedialyte: counteracts dehydration
  • Pepcid AC: to control vomiting
  • Pepto-Bismol: for diarrhea, nausea, vomiting
  • Phillips’ Milk of Magnesia: for constipation
  • Preparation H: soothes sore bottom
  • Solarcaine: topical anesthetic, helpful for sunburn
  • Vicks VapoRub: for congestion
  • Witch hazel: topical antiseptic

Toy terrier dog.

Pet Home Remedies & First Aid Help

In the best of all possible worlds, emergencies never happen or if they do, pet owners have a professional medical kit handy. These should be stocked with sterile gauze pads in different sizes,first-aid elastic Ace bandages, needle-less syringes and eyedroppers for medication and even stretchers. You can buy commercial kits from pet supply stores or put together your own, and it’s very helpful to have a handy pet first aid how-to guide handy.

But all too often pet owners don’t think about being prepared until after the first emergency. If you find yourself faced with a doggy or kitty health crises you may be surprised how many everyday items around the house or in your pantry can be helpful. I’ve lifted most of the tips in today’s blog from my pet first aid book–where you can find more specifics .

23 Helpful Household Items

  • Blanket/cookie sheet/ironing board: stretcher
  • Bubble Wrap: stabilize leg fracture/injury
  • Canned Pumpkin: for constipation or diarrhea
  • Condoms: to cover injured/bleeding paw
  • Dawn Dishwashing Soap: decontaminate fur
  • Heat pad: for arthritis/aches
  • Hose/sink spray: flushing wounds
  • Hydrogen peroxide (3%): given orally to prompt vomiting
  • Ice bag/frozen peas: topical pain control & cooling heatstroke
  • Karo syrup/honey: for shock
  • KY Jelly: lubricant such as for eye out of socket
  • Olive oil: to suffocate/kill ear mites
  • Pliers: remove porcupine quills/foreign object in mouth
  • Pantyhose/necktie: muzzle
  • Mustache trimmer: clip fur around wounds
  • Needle/Safety pin: acupuncture CPR
  • Teabags, soaked and cooled: to treat hot spots
  • Turkey baster: flush wounds, give liquid medicine
  • Rectal thermometer
  • Saran Wrap: seals wounds, holds bandage together without sticking to fur
  • Sterile Saline Solution: flush wounds, eye injuries
  • Squirt gun, squeeze bottle: give liquid medicine/flush wounds
  • Yogurt: settle digestion, control gas

More Pet First Aid Help

First aid saves pets, yet DIY vet care is something to avoid. Y’all know that I’m a huge advocate for partnering with your veterinarian for the best possible pet care. But the truth is, when your cat or dog has a veterinary emergency sometimes there’s just not enough time to get your fur-kid into the car and across town. When minutes matter, first aid can prevent further injury or even save your cat or dog’s life.

I’ve blogged about first aid before, including every day items in your current pantry or medicine chest that work great in an emergency. It’s always best to prepare ahead of time. Please invest in a first aid kit, take a pet first aid course from an expert like my friend Arden Moore, and keep a pet first aid book on hand for those just-in-case moments. Even though April is Pet First Aid Awareness Month, be ready every day of the year to keep your cats and dogs safe.

Check out this PAW-some Infographic from 800PetMeds.com for some of the most common emergencies and what to do. And then keep your paws crossed you’ll never need the info!

Thanks to the folks at 1800petmeds.com for this incredible info-graphic!

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. NOTE: Bling, Bitches & Blood sometimes shares affiliate links to products that may help you with your pets, but we only share what we feel is appropriate.

Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered? Do you have a new kitten and need answers? Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, and sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways and appearances related to my September Day pet-centric THRILLERS WITH BITE!

Heatstroke Dangers: Pet First Aid for Hot Weather

Fun in the sun can quickly turn to tragedy if pet owners don’t take precautions to prevent cat and dog heatstroke dangers. Pet heatstroke is common because cats and dogs can’t effectively keep cool in hot summer weather.

dog heatstroke

Dogs pant to cool off. All images courtesy of DepositPhotos.com

How Hot Dogs & Cats Cool Off

Cats and dogs can’t sweat to cool off. For hot dogs, normal panting provides a rapid exchange of cool outside air, and evaporation off the tongue keeps dog temperature normal.

Cats typically don’t pant–they lick and groom themselves and the evaporation off of their fur helps keep them cool. If you see your kitty panting in hot weather, that’s a danger sign that your cool cat is too darn hot!

Some breeds are more at risk. Dogs and cats with smooshed in faces like Pugs, Bulldogs, and Persians have a harder time cooling off even with panting. And when the outside air is the same or greater than pet’s normal body temperature  of 101 to 102.5 degrees, deadly heat stroke develops.

Hot weather safety also includes keeping paw pads  from burning, preventing sunburn, and even being aware of water intoxication — yes, that’s a thing! See more here. 

persian cat heatstroke

Brachycephalic breeds like Persians and Pugs have a harder time cooling off because of shortened airways that interfere with effective panting.

Cars and Heat Stroke

Cars become deathtraps in even relatively mild temperatures. On a 78-degree day, a shaded car reaches temperatures of 90 degrees but if parked in the sun, it will reach 160 degrees in minutes.

Leaving the car and air conditioning running is no guarantee of safety. Today, one of the most modern available for police dog safety is the computerized Hot-N-Pop system able to sense when the interior of the vehicle has become too hot for the K9 officer. When that happens, the system automatically rolls down the rear windows (windows have metal screens to prevent the dog from jumping out) and activates large window fans that bring in fresh air to help cool the dog. The Hot-N-Pop also activates the car’s emergency lights and horn, as well as sending a signal to a pager or phone held by the canine handler.

hot dog in car

Open windows probably won’t significantly reduce the heat for your dog–it can still be a deathtrap!

Pets & Cars, What To Do

Of course, most pet parents don’t have a Hot-N-Pop system. So what do you do if you see a pet closed up in a car? I know the first impulse is to break the glass yourself, but you may not have the ability, the legality or resources to do that. Here’s what you can do.

  • Use your phone–call animal control or dial 911. These folks have the authority not only to enter someone’s car, but also offer life saving first aid.
  • Also, go inside the nearest business–often a post office or grocery–and get the folks there to announce over the intercom for the pet’s person to get back to the car ASAP.
  • Then stay with the care until you confirm that help has arrived.

Symptoms of Pets Heatstroke

Symptoms of mild heatstroke are body temperature of 104 to 106 degrees, bright red tongue and gums, thick sticky saliva, and rapid panting. When body temperatures go above 106 degrees, the pet’s gums become pale, he acts dizzy, bleeds from the nose or has bloody vomiting and diarrhea, and ultimately becomes comatose. These pets can develop disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) where the red blood cells blow up and can’t carry oxygen.

Getting the temperature down to 104 degrees or less is more important than rushing the pet to the emergency clinic—but severe cases DO need veterinary attention once you give first-aid. Rectal thermometers usually only register as high as 108 degrees and pets with severe heatstroke may have a body temperature that goes off the end and reaches 110 or higher.

dog feverPet First Aid for Heat Stroke

For mild heatstroke, bring your puppy into an air-conditioned space and turn on a fan, so the outside temperature is lower than his body temperature and panting can work. Offer ice cubes to lick, or cold Gatorade or Pedialyte or water to drink, and wrap him in cold wet towels.

first aid book

For more life saving info, get the pet first aid book!

For severe heatstroke, soak the pet with cold water from the hose, or in the tub or sink. Place ice packs (bags of frozen peas work well) in his “armpit” and groin region where there are major blood vessels. The cold will chill the blood, and as it circulates, will cool the whole body from the inside.

Pets with temperatures at or above 107 degrees need a cold-water enema for even quicker cooling. Use a turkey baster or a contact lens solution bottle filled with ice water if you don’t have an enema bag. Grease the tip with petroleum jelly, K-Y or vegetable oil and insert the tip into the rectum and squeeze gently to fill the cavity with fluid. Once his temperature drops to 104, wrap him up in a towel and get him to the emergency room.

Prevent Heatstroke

It’s even better to prevent heatstroke in pets by providing shade and lots of cool water, or simply keeping pets inside. NEVER leave pets unattended in cars—that’s just asking for disaster. The ASPCA urges everyone to take the PLEDGE to Save Pet Lives this summer.

Have you ever seen dogs or cats left in hot cars? What did you do? How do you keep your fur-kids cool and safe during summer? Are there fav hot-weather-games they enjoy? Do tell!

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered? Do you have a new kitten and need answers? Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, and sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways and appearances related to my September Day pet-centric THRILLERS WITH BITE!

Summer Book Bundle Contest! Win 20 Books, Kindle Fire & Follow BookBub

Guess who’s participating in this promo? (Me!) Enter to win 20 Crime Fiction & Thrillers, including books from authors like D.V. Berkom and Seeley James — just for following me and other great Crime Fiction & Thriller authors on BookBub contest.
EXTENDED UNTIL MONDAY JULY 16!bookbub contest

Enter BookBub Contest, Win 20 Crime & Fiction Thrillers

PLUS a Kindle Fire or Nook Tablet!

BookBub contest features all your fav authors and books (including mine!) with links to ALL the different store platforms (Kobo, GooglePlay, Nook, Kindle) in one place. AND when you “follow” an author, you get immediate notice about a new book releases and preorders. It’s like a Facebook “follow” but without all the annoying spam, LOL!

Why’s that important? Well…my next Thriller With Bite! releases soon and you don’t want to miss it. 🙂 You can find me here on BookBub.

This giveaway ends MONDAY July 16, so make sure you hurry and enter! Good luck!

GO HERE TO ENTER > http://bit.ly/crimefiction

A Natural Choice? Holistic Pets Book Give Away!

Natural healing offers integrative options for cats and dogs. I’m celebrating good pet care all month long with this natural healing book give away! Love herbal therapies? Want to learn about acupressure and touch therapies? Here’s your chance!

NATURAL HEALING BOOK GIVE AWAY

Enter below for your chance to win a PAW-tographed copy of the print book NEW CHOICES IN NATURAL HEALING FOR DOGS AND CATS. The winner also will receive some bling — a paw-tastic rhinestone jewelry set!

NOTE: I can only ship physical prizes within the U.S. and Canada, sorry — if you’re outside the mailing area, and win, you’ll receive the Ebook version of the book.

Ready–set– ENTER!

natural healing book give away