How to Create A Cat Safe Christmas Tree

Cat safe Christmas tree? Is there any other kind? I’ve not decided if we’ll put up a tree this year. In the past, our old girl, Seren-Kitty, ignored the decorations and so did Magic. We were lucky that way—until Karma-Kat came along. Bravo-Dawg eggs him on, and last year was quite an experience.

Karma turned the tree into a kitty jungle gym! And Bravo-Boy loved playing “tug” with branches. We’ll play it by ear (furry ones, of course!) with the decorating this year. Meanwhile, here are my annual tips to help with YOUR tree, and you can read more about pet-safe holiday decorations here.

cat safe chrismas tree

Karma-Kat didn’t read the safety manual!

CREATE A CAT SAFE CHRISTMAS TREE

Karma considers the Christmas tree to be an early holiday gift. Many pets can’t resist the urge to sniff, claw, water—and Karma thinks it’s great fun to scale the branches to reach the highest possible perch. I don’t blame him. It’s normal for cats to compete for the top spot (literally and figuratively) to secure their place in kitty society, and dogs may want to “mark” the convenient indoor doggy signpost. He’s so heavy, though, that high tree top shenanigans aren’t in the cards.

Our tree has bunches of red and white silk rose buds, a string of “pearls” and some cat-safe sparkly but prickly décor that doesn’t appeal to Karma. We also offer him treat-filled puzzle toys placed well away from the tree so other spots in the house are more appealing.

Cat safe Christmas tree

Create a cat safe tree your kittens and cats will leave alone–or can safely play with.

WHY CATS LOVE THE CHRISTMAS TREE

Kitty can’t resist the urge to sniff, cheek rub, claw—and scale the branches to reach the highest possible perch. Don’t blame your cat. It’s normal for cats to compete for the top spot (literally and figuratively) to secure their place in kitty society.

Youngsters won’t care about social standing, but high energy kitten play turns the holiday tree into a jungle gym. Tree encounters of the kitty kind not only risk breaking your heirloom ornaments, your furred family members can be injured by chewing or swallow dangerous items. Read about pet proofing your holidays here. Rather than fight a losing battle to keep cats at bay, create a second cat-safe tree with these 12 tips, so the fur-kids can enjoy the holidays as much as you do.

Keep breakable holiday ornaments out of reach.

Cats turn anything into toys, even Christmas ornaments.

12 TIPS FOR A CAT SAFE CHRISTMAS TREE

  • Put yourself in your cat’s “paws.” Satisfy her desire to claw, lounge on branches, and trust that it won’t tip over under her assault. Match the tree size, sturdiness, base (perhaps add guy-wires for steadiness) to the activity level and number of cats.
  • Ditch the lights, and any “fake-snow” flocking that can be chewed or swallowed. Instead, decorate with cotton balls or pillow-stuffing fleece for that snowy look on branches or around the base. If you’ve chosen a real tree, water with plain water and no additives in case kitty decides to drink.
  • Strings and garland look great on the tree, but prove deadly inside a cat when swallowed. Dried flowers like baby’s breath look lovely and are nontoxic even if clueless kittens nibble.
    If you don’t mind your cats turning the tree into a jungle gym, insert a few sprigs of dried catnip—but be prepared for the cats to dismantle the tree!
  • Catnip toys make great kitty tree decorations and won’t be destroyed during the feline assaults. Use “orphan” socks (singletons without a mate), fill with the ‘nip, and knot the open end.
  • Jingle bells (quarter size or larger) can’t be swallowed and offer movement and sound when hung from ribbon on a branch. Put one inside the sealed catnip sock for more jingly fun.
  • Furry toy mice come in bright colors—or go with a standard white theme—and can be placed in the branches for your mouse-aholic feline.
  • Craft stores offer inexpensive bags filled with soft pompoms in a variety of colors and sizes—even sparkly ones. Cats love to play with these. Pompoms are so cheap you can fill the branches with one color theme, or a rainbow approach.
Holiday lights risk electrical shock

It’s not just the ornaments, but the electrical lights that can cause dangerous burns or death if chomped. Even the pine needles can cause injury if swallowed.

  • Many cats adore feathers but remember they can chew and swallow these. As long as supervised, a few feathers placed in the tree can be a fun accent as well. How about a bright feather boa instead of garland?
  • Small stuffed toys—kitty theme or otherwise—appeal to many cats. Place around the base of the tree. Feline puzzle toys filled with special treats also are fun.
  • Don’t forget the “cheap thrills.” Empty boxes, wads of holiday paper, and even paper shopping bags thrill cats. Remove bag handles so the cat won’t get hung around her neck.
    Toss a few special kitty treats in the boxes or bags. The smellier the treat, the better cats like them.

Be prepared to re-decorate the tree after the cats have fun. But a “Cat-mas” tree not only answers your kitty’s Santa Paws prayers, it means she’ll be more likely to leave your formal tree and decorations alone. That promotes a merry Christmas for the whole family, furry and otherwise.

Here’s Karma-Kat’s first tree experience…hoo boy!

What have I missed? How do you keep the holidays safe for your cats? Teaching kittens the ropes may be easier than dealing with an adult cat. Have you ever had a cat-astrophe with your tree? Do tell!

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook,and get a FREE BOOK when you sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Want the insider info on the latest books and appearances? Join my team and get advance sneak peaks related to my THRILLERS WITH BITE!


Comments

How to Create A Cat Safe Christmas Tree — 4 Comments

  1. Pingback: How to Pet Proof Holidays: 11 Life Saving Tips

  2. Pingback: Pets Gifts: Learn How to Give Cats & Dogs As Gifts

  3. Great tips, Amy! We’ve been lucky (so far) that our ginger tabby girl doesn’t seem interested in climbing the tree. She does have fun batting the low ornaments, so we put the safe, unbreakable kind down low. She also enjoys hanging out under the tree. I think she feels cozy and protected under there.

    But there is one Christmas hazard that we discovered the hard way – curling ribbon. When I found a piece in her litter box a few days after Christmas, I took her to the vet right away. Fortunately she’d passed it without a problem, but the vet said it could have kinked up her intestines and killed her. Now our house has an absolute embargo on any kind of ribbon like that, and we’ve warned all our family and friends that we can’t have it here. She just can’t resist stringy things. It’s a challenge with my beading projects. Sigh. Good thing she’s a cutie pie!

Leave a Reply