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Cats & Easter Lilies Danger, A Deadly Combo!

by | Mar 31, 2021 | Cat Behavior & Care, Emergency Help | 3 comments

Easter Lilies Danger

I know that I’m preaching to the kitty choir when I write about Easter lilies’ danger each year. Lilies cause toxic reactions in pets when eaten, especially cats. The gorgeous lily makes its appearance each Easter, decorating the church, home, and garden. I love lilies and have daylilies and Asiatic lilies outside in the redesigned garden, but I can’t have them in my house. I won’t risk having an Easter lily anywhere near my Karma-Kat or Shadow-Pup. For cats especially, the fragrant blooms can mean death.

Refer to this post about other Easter dangers for pets.

easter lilies danger

What’s WRONG with this picture??? Image Courtesy of DepositPhotos.com

Don’t get me wrong, I love lilies. They’re gorgeous. And I love flowers. But my Seren-kitty used to munch any plant I bring into the house and Karma will play with anything.

easter lilies

Image courtesy of DepositPhotos.com

Easter Lilies Danger: Kinds of Lilies

Many lilies are lethal to cats. Easter lilies, stargazer lilies, and Asiatic lilies are the most dangerous, and different cats react in various ways. The plants contain a chemical that can damage the kidneys, and kill your cat. Dogs often gnaw leaves, dig up the plant, or eat the whole thing.

Felines more often paw-pat and shred leaves and stems during play, and may be poisoned when they later lick and clean their paws and claws. Just biting a leaf or petal can be enough to cause serious kidney disease. Hopefully, that picture, above, used fake blooms to stage the image–YIKES!

CATS CAN BE POISONED BY DRINKING THE WATER FROM THE VASE!

SIGNS OF EASTER LILY POISONING

Cats poisoned by Easter lily toxin typically suffer kidney failure within 36 to 72 hours. Symptoms include vomiting, lethargy or loss of appetite. Some cats suffer permanent kidney damage and lose their lives, while others can recover if treated in time with dialysis that gives the organs enough time to heal.

Seren loved eating roses…which thankfully, are edible and safe (other than the thorns!).

Easter Lilies Danger & Toxic Plant Concerns

The easiest way to protect your cats is to keep toxic plants out of reach—or out of your house altogether. Besides lilies, other potential harmful plants include rhododendron, sago palm, kalanchoe, and schefflera. Azalea can cause vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, coma, and death. Eating or chewing caladium, dieffenbachia or philodendron makes the tongue and throat swell up so breathing is difficult. Mother-in-law’s tongue (snake plant) causes everything from mouth irritation to collapse. Crown of thorns and English ivy will prompt thirst, vomiting and diarrhea, stomach pain, and death in one to two days. Holly also causes stomach pain, vomiting, and diarrhea.

You can keep your pet family members safe and sound by choosing only pet-friendly safe varieties for your garden and home. Calla lilies and peace lilies, which don’t belong to the Lilium genus, are harmless to cats.

calla lily

Calla lily is safe for cats.

peace lily

Peace lily is NOT toxic to cats.

Poisonous Plants

There are many other plants that prompt mild problems, such as excess salivation or mouth discomfort. Keeping these out of reach of curious paws may be sufficient to protect your animals. But pet lovers should steer clear of the worst plant offenders, both inside and out. If you see your pet with one or more of these signs, particularly if a suspect plant is within reach, get help immediately! First aid can save the cat or dog’s life. Then take the pet to see the veterinarian as quickly as possible.

FIRST AID FOR PLANT POISONING

Different poisons require very specific first aid. Usually, that will be either 1) induce vomiting, (cats do this on their own very well–but never when you want them to!) or 2) give milk or water to wash out the mouth and dilute the poison. Making the pet vomit the wrong poisonous plant, though, could make a serious situation even more deadly, so you MUST know what to do for each type of plant.

Now available as an Audiobook, for emergency advice anytime, anywhere!

Detailed advice for dealing with the most common plant poisoning is available in the book The First-Aid Companion for Dogs and Cats. The ASPCA Animal Poison-Control Center is available for telephone consultations (1-888-426-4435) in case of poisoning emergency.

What cat-safe plants do you have in your home? How do you keep the cat from destroying/eating them? Have you ever had a kitty-plant encounter of the dangerous kind?

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3 Comments

  1. Beth

    I knew that Easter lilies were bad for cats, but it wasn’t until recently that I learned that all lilies are and how detrimental they are.

  2. Frank Steele

    As always, so much valuable information. Thank you!

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. 7 Pet Poisons: Common Pet Poisons & First Aid to Save Pets Lives - […] 3. Plant poisonings are particularly dangerous to mouthy pets. Some varieties that can be harmful to pets include lilies,…
  2. Adopting An Easter Bunny? Make Mine Chocolate! - […] and hope. Enjoy the egg hunts, the Easter candy, dinners with family and friends, safe plants (BEWARE of Easter…
  3. Pet Poisons 101: Keep Cats & Dogs Safe from Pet Toxins - […] Cats & Easter Lilies Danger, A Deadly Combo! […]
  4. Pet Easter Dangers: Lilies, Chocolate, and Bunnies, Oh My! - […] TOXIC LILIES […]

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