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Cats Under Attack! TNR, TB, Toxo & Talkback

Cats Under Attack! TNR, TB, Toxo & Talkback

CatInTree-SaphireDream

Managed feral cats can live healthy lives. Image Copr. Sapphire Dream/Flickr

Hating cats, and especially hating feral cats has become a hot topic. No, I don’t mean my cats have turned on me, although Seren and Karma have yet to call a truce. Actually, the past week or so has been filled with an array of articles, posts, and flame-war discussions denigrating cats as well as those who attempt to help them.

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HATING FERAL CATS

This isn’t new. Cats have been the scapegoat for many of the world’s ills. Perhaps it’s because our felines have such great success surviving what would fell lesser creatures. After all, there’s a reason that “9 lives” myth has been repeated for eons. Read more here about cat myth-teries debunked.

Cats, particular the issue of ferals and TNR, seem to bring out all the trolls. For more on TNR, read this blog post from last year.

HATING CATS & THE BLAME GAME

News outlets eager to sell stories and get more eyeballs on their venues often duck fact-checking and opt for hand-waving sensationalism. So cats are blamed for:

  • rabies (despite the fact that wildlife reservoirs–bats, raccoons, foxes–are the more likely host)
  • “crazy brain disease” and being baby-killers due to toxoplasmosis (despite the fact most humans harbor this without any problem, as a result of eating rare meat–and it’s easily preventable with just modest hygiene)
  • Bird predation (despite human destruction of habitat and other critters–like rats and snakes–impact birds at much higher rates).
  • And now, a scare that cats transmitted tuberculosis to people, via contact with badgers. (?!) “We don’ need no stinkin’ badgers!” (sorry, couldn’t resist but it’s NOT funny)

The anti-TNR folks point to these issues to convince us lethal means–usually poisoning–of feral cats should be implemented. That’s worked SO WELL over the past 100+ years (NOT!). The results have been ineffective, inhumane and costly.

My owned cats Seren and Karma stay inside, not to protect the wildlife from them, but to protect them from the wildlife. I agree that companion cats merit protection. But so do feral felines, who through no fault of their own, live life on the wild side. And truth be told, both Seren and Karma were but one paw-step away from living that wild side life, and being the targets of cat haters.

Sound harsh? So sue me.

TNR (TRAP, NEUTER, RETURN), THE HUMANE CHOICE

TNR is not a “single” thing. It’s an all-encompassing effort that not only trap-neuter-returns but also adopts out the adoptable “strays” that wander in or get dumped, places kittens able to adapt as pets, euthanizes the un-save-able, and helps relieve the burden for local animal welfare organizations. So according to some, TNR is a “failure” because cat colonies don’t go away simply with the trap-neuter-return portions of the equation.

Hmnnnn.

Is TNR perfect? No. Is killing cats a perfect solution? No. Are there valid arguments on both sides? Of course. That’s always the case when the situation isn’t black and white, but instead all shades of gray, tabby, calico and more.

AMY’S RESPONSE TO HATING FERAL CATS

Here’s my response to one thread of comments:

“I’m delighted there are so many here who claim to have the best interests of cats (shelter, stray, feral, pet) at heart. And I’m saddened that rather than working together to help the situation, great pains are taken to denigrate any effort. It’s very easy (on both sides) to pick and choose the “facts” one wishes to spotlight in an effort to support an argument and point fingers how WRONG WRONG WRONG the other party is. Rather than allow emotions to run the show, it’s a much more difficult — and ultimately rewarding and ethical –stance to offer a balanced look. Rather than point out the shortcomings and condemning a particular practice based on the FAILURE, why not look at the successes, analyze why they worked and how to improve these efforts?

That might actually make the positive difference all parties purport to want.

Thank you to those who truly do want what’s best for the cats. Your passion could indeed make a positive difference for cats. They’re the innocent victims in this tug-o-war.

And as far as I can see, cats and cat lovers (on both sides) lose the battle when all that matters is who can shout loudest. True journalism, it seems, is dead and advertorials have inherited the hand-waving space.”

I’m tired of having to quash the bad information each time it’s resurrected by folks who ignore reality. And I’m sickened by those who use these issues in a war against companion animals who argue that it’s more ‘humane’ to trap and kill feral cats, rather than to manage colonies in which healthy cats unable to accept human companions live for a decade or longer. Properly cared for feral colonies provide a protective barrier from diseased animals (and other cats)–because as we know, kitties chase away “stranger danger” and only reluctantly accept in newbies to the fold. Seren drives that home every day with her c’attitude toward Karma. Of course, the operative words there are “properly managed/cared for.”

HATING FERAL CATS IN THE NEWS

Here are just some of the recent stories, with commentary, that have been published. Some make valid points, although I don’t necessarily agree with the conclusions. There also have been some solid rebuttals.

The Evil Of Outdoor Cats is the story that started the recent furor, and here’s the author’s follow up with some more response and a nicely composed Response from CWA Member Anne Moss and from well known pet expert Steve Dale.

TB Caught from Cats and a vet’s warning about More To Come (notice how the vet says it’s low risk–but the headlines trumpet something else.)

No Evidence to Support Killing Feral Cats offers a great response from Peter Wolf with facts and figures to back it up

I’ll let y’all decide for yourselves. Some of my colleagues have speculated we’re in the middle of an orchestrated PR campaign against TNR and cats in general. What do you think? Do our responses to these stories fuel the fire? Are we preaching to the choir without any chance to change minds?

Oh, and I have no doubt the trolls will come out in force. So in advance, y’all can refer to my comments policy here.

NOTE: COMMENTS ON THIS POST HAVE BEEN CLOSED.


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Feral Cats, TNR & Cat Fancy Magazine

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The past couple of weeks brought two pieces of upsetting news, and their convergence prompted this blog. You see, a new report on the impact of cats upon wildlife extrapolated old statistics mixed with new suppositions to paint felines as the devil incarnate–not a new situation by any means (witness the dark ages of black-cat-witchery). Many of my cat writers colleagues and blogpaws friends have addressed these concerns in well written posts, and frankly, I wouldn’t have felt the need.

Except that I also learned that Cat Fancy magazine, first published in 1965, has been sold. 

My earliest bylines as a “pet journalist” were with Cat Fancy. I got my first book contract because an editor read and liked a couple of my Cat Fancy articles. The magazine gave me my first “assignment” (rather than me submitting a query)–I really thought I’d arrived as a writer! But now Bow Tie is poised for change and Cat Fancy readers and contributors together hope this next “cat life” will be even better for all involved.

Sadly, at the moment things aren’t looking so good for the current Cat Fancy (and other Bow Tie) contributors. Many of them are owed a boat load of money for completed and published work, but since the new owner didn’t purchase the debt, chances are my colleagues won’t ever get paid. That’s suck-isity on a huge scale. Right up there with the sucky attacks on cats.

The last article I wrote for Cat Fancy (below) concerned feral cats. In the olden days (dang, that was 9 lives ago!) I was proud to be a contributor and wish only good things for the current editors and contributors now in furry limbo. I pray the TNR program also continues to thrive.

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The un-owned cats of America caterwaul from alleyways, give birth in woodpiles, and slink beneath dumpsters eking out a meager existence on the scraps of civilization. Nobody knows how many live homeless and unloved, but wherever cats gather, controversy soon follows.

Many “solutions” have been tried, and opinions abound regarding the best way to deal with un-owned and feral felines. In the last decade, a small army of dedicated and caring cat advocates including the Feral Cat Project (which lists several success stories!) has come to believe that TNR is a viable and ethical answer.

Defining TNR

TNR stands for “trap-neuter-return,” a program designed to control and decrease the numbers of roaming felines. Trapped cats receive a health exam to identify very sick cats, which are euthanized. Healthy kitties are sterilized and vaccinated, to prevent reproduction or illnesses such as rabies.

Friendly adult cats and tame-able kittens are adopted while the feral (wild) adults live out their lives–sometimes a decade or longer–in the managed colony. The removal of one ear tip identifies these cats as managed. The caregiver(s) monitor the colony and provides food and shelter.

In The Beginning…

TNR first appeared in Europe, and became better known once animal welfare societies in Great Britain began advocating the approach more than 30 years ago. Louise Holton, an early proponent, first learned of TNR in the mid-1970s while living in South Africa. “I fed colonies of cats in Johannesburg,” she says. “As soon as they started talking about TNR it just made sense to me, and I trapped my colonies and fixed them through the Johannesburg SPCA.”

It took longer for the idea to reach America. While working in animal protection, Becky Robinson noticed feral cats in downtown Washington, DC at around the same time that Holton relocated to the area. Animal welfare organizations offered no help. “I was pretty shocked when they said I should bring cats in for euthanasia,” says Holton, now with Alley Cat Rescue.

“We intended to spay and neuter,” says Robinson, “but we ran into all kinds of roadblocks. It was crystal clear that this had to be addressed.”

Believing education was the key, Holton founded Alley Cat Allies (ACA) in 1990 as an educational resource for humane methods of feral cat control. Today, Robinson is the National Director of ACA.

The TNR concept gained national attention in 1995 when Joan Miller of the Cat Fanciers Associationpresented a talk on cat lifestyle diversity at the AVMA Animal Welfare Forum. The next year she and Dr. Patricia Olson (then affiliated with the American Humane Association) co-coordinated the first National Conference On Feral Cats in Denver. Presenters offered a variety of views, and came to the conclusion that national coordination was necessary. “Alley Cat Allies began to grow more rapidly after that,” says Miller.

Hisses And Purrs

Not everyone supports TNR. “Pro and con is an easy way to categorize,” says Dr. Margaret Slater, a veterinary epidemiologist from Texas A&M University and author of Community Approaches to Feral Cats. “But almost everybody has a gradation of views. Nothing is black and white.”

The most common objections focus on protection of the cats themselves. People argue that as a domestic species, it’s our responsibility to keep cats safely confined. But feral cats can rarely be tamed or easily contained.

Relocating them becomes difficult when sanctuaries fill up. When cats are removed from an area that offers shelter and food, others quickly move into that niche–a “vacuum effect” that argues for maintaining the colony in its original location. Even if trap and kill programs weren’t expensive and ineffective, most Americans dislike the notion of treating cats as vermin.

As an introduced or “exotic” species, critics such as the American Bird Conservancy argue cats should be removed from the environment to protect native wildlife, particularly endangered species. Cats cause the most problems where ecosystems are already in the most trouble such as on island ecosystems where any predator is a problem. TNR is not a good choice in these fragile environments.

But proponents argue that for the most part, cats hunt more rodents than birds, and usually only catch sick, old, or very young birds. “Cats get blamed for a lot of things, but it’s almost never just cats,” says Dr. Slater. For instance, rats also are an introduced species, and quite good predators of many birds. Robinson adds, “A bulldozer on a spring day probably does more damage [to the ecosystem than a feral cat in his entire life.” Even critics of TNR often support the programs in situations such as barn or city cat colonies since no endangered species are at risk.

Looking for Common Ground

Alley Cat Allies and other educational resources have made great strides in educating the public about feral cat solutions. How much TNR has grown isn’t easy to determine, though, because most programs involve volunteers and little tracking information is available. “The really big comprehensive and oldest programs are primarily in the Northeast and West Coast,” says Dr. Slater, “but it’s pretty spotty. You can make any statement you like because there’s no data to support or refute it.”

There is common ground. People on both sides of the TNR fence agree that owned cats should be sterilized and identified, and safely confined in some way. “Rather than fighting over TNR, we need to think about how to turn off the source of cats,” says Dr. Slater. “There’s always going to be more cats if we can’t turn that faucet off.”

Feral cat programs have impacted our world in an intangible but perhaps even more important way. TNR demonstrates that all cats have a value, even those that can’t be touched. We as human beings now recognized our ethical responsibility toward these community cats and that they should be cared for and treated humanely.

“TNR changes public attitudes about the value of cats,” says Miller. “That message is enormous.”

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Learn more about TNR in Ellen Perry Berkely’s marvelous books Maverick Cats and TNR: Past, Present & Future (sadly, out of print but available used).

 I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered? Do you have a new kitten and need answers? Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, listen to the weekly radio show, check out weekly PUPPY CARE must knows, and sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways and appearances related to my  THRILLERS WITH BITE!

Monday Mentions: Plague, Spam & Writers

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Welcome to all the new followers! After last week’s Monday Mentions after the amazing Thrillerfest weekend, lots of folks “discovered” the blog. Turns out that folks who read (and write) thrillers often have a furry muse in the background–and also may be considering the pros and cons of continuing the traditional pub route vs “going rogue.” *ahem* I mean, ‘indy.’

More on specific writer-icity tomorrow as the weekly Tuesday Tips Kindle-lization Journey continues with tips on self promotion. This blog focuses on furry stuff usually on Woof Wednesday and Feline Friday. Monday Mentions–hey, that’s today!–offers a mash up of awesomeness, some of the great blogs, articles and other assorted WOW schtuff that makes me sit up and take notice. So I figure it’ll wag some other writerly tails, too.

To that end, those who have a new book, blog, article, fill-in-the-blank that might be a fit, please email me (amy AT shojai.com) with the particulars of your book/work and I’d love to feature you on a future blog. Hey, it’s all about helping each other out, right?

I suspect thriller writers (including those with a fantastical bent) appreciate some of the biting tidbits in today’s blog. Enjoy and share.

MINI BOOK REVIEW

Got a copy of “the Things That Keep Us Here” by Carla Buckley (Bantam) as a freebie at the Thrillerfest banquet. Started reading on the plane flight home. Couldn’t put it down, read straight through and finished it late that night. OUTSTANDING!

It’s what I’d call a “quiet” thriller, one with such internal tension and driving characterization that you nearly explode waiting to see what happens next. It’s “Hot Zone” meets “Ordinary People” and is awful and heartrending and scary-bad in just the way a thriller should be–with brilliant writing. Oh, and a dog appears in the story with a pivotal role.

WRITER CRAPPIOCCA NEWS

Rejections-R-Us: 30 Famous Authors’ Rejections–plus some more Well Known Self-Pub’d Authors and now they’re thumbing their collective noses, doncha think?

Spam Hits Kindle  Okay, this is old news to self published folks, but others may not be aware of the latest get-rich-quick scheme to “aggregate” content (legally? illegally?), roll it into a ball and self-pub for big bucks. Uh…nope. IMO readers are smarter than that. But it does create lots of crappiocca.


CANINE CURIOSITIES

AMAZING pictures and story that purports to be the dog SEAL that cornered Osama Ben Laden

Seeing Eye-To-Eye: How Dogs REALLY See the World, a fascinating look at eye structure and debunking past ideas about canine sight.

New AKC Therapy Dog Title — it’s about time! Dogs that have met the criteria can be awarded the AKC Therapy Dog title (THD)

FANTASTIC FELINE FACTS

Should You Get Your Cat From A Pet Store? My colleague and outstanding cat writer Christine Church has an excellent examiner.com column you’ll want to check out

Where Does Kitty Roam? A study of free-ranging ferals and housecats, covers some amazing ground. All you folks writing about were-cats and suchlike might want to take a look at how real cats do it.

SCARY SCH*T & LOL!

Bubonic Plague Affects Pets–And People!  It affects cats most often because they hunt critters infested with disease-carrying fleas, but dogs also can catch the disease. That “cat fight abscess” might instead be a bubo! (Anyone else thinking “medical thriller plot?”)

Learn To Pick Your Battles–A Tale of a Metal Chicken a hilarious blog my friend Judy Gharis sent me, enjoy!

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions–and to stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, listen to the weekly radio show, and sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter with pet book give-aways!

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