Woof Wednesday: Canine Cake, Bad Backs & Dig THIS!

”Royal

Cynthia over at The Interior Design Hound posts the most outrageous, fun, and interesting dog-matic information on her blog. She featured the Corgi Cake, created by Michelle Sugar Art, along with a kewl video of the dogs enjoying their snack–(does that smack of canine cannibalism?!), plus lots more Royal Canines through history.

At least this edible Corgi isn’t prone to back problems the way real long-bodied, short-legged dogs are. I’m sure the Royal Family wouldn’t have a problem funding cutting edge care should they suffer an injury. What would you do if your dog suddenly became paralyzed? Here’s a true story from Pet Care in the New Century. 

MODERN MIRACLES: JENNY TAKES A STAND

When Jenny the Dachshund stopped climbing the stairs, her owner, Connie Mallory of Redmon, Washington, knew something was wrong. “I put some ice on her back and she got better,” says Connie, “but it didn’t last.” Within a few days the 13-year-old dog couldn’t walk and had to drag her back legs. Her rear end was totally paralyzed.

Connie tearfully called her sister, who urged her to attend a lecture held that same day by a veterinary chiropractor from Seattle. He had a new therapy called VOM that was supposed to offer new hope to pets that suffered from back and other orthopedic problems. Connie was skeptical.

She didn’t want Jenny to suffer, and she was reluctant to put her through the trauma of surgery. Feeling she didn’t have much choice, she made an appointment to have Jenny put to sleep. But that Sunday, on the way to the vet’s office Connie stopped on an impulse to listen to what Dr. William Inman had to say. She arrived in time for the last half hour of the lecture.

Connie sat with the paralyzed Dachshund on her lap in the back of the room, petting Jenny and trying to stop her tears. Jenny wasn’t the only dog in the room—Dr. Inman was conducting demonstrations during the lecture—and before she knew it Connie had her dog being examined by the veterinarian.

Dr. Inman used the activator to examine and treat Jenny. The paralyzed little dog lay quietly on the table without moving throughout the treatment. Then the doctor stood her up on the table.  “She took three or four steps—and everyone in the room started crying!” says Connie. “She’s 16 years old now, and still walking and even running. Jenny moves a little sideways, but she keeps on ticking.”

Of course, when the lil’ guys are healthy they drive us nuts in other ways. Do your Dachshunds dig? What about your holy Terriers? What do you do about doggy digging maniacs? The latest Ask Amy offers some suggestions but I bet y’all have even more, please share!

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions–and to stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, listen to the weekly radio show, and sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter with pet book give-aways!

Comments

Woof Wednesday: Canine Cake, Bad Backs & Dig THIS! — 5 Comments

  1. Pingback: Join in the Love Revolution–#MyWANA « Kristen Lamb's Blog

  2. My Brittany Spaniel used to dig….so my dad installed an electric wire around the buttom of the fence. I think it shocked me more than it did Raider….he still got out! Animals are smart…

  3. Aha, the old electric wire–but see, it has to be MORE aversive than the behavior is rewarding. *s* I might be willing to brave a shock to get to the back of M&Ms…just sayin’

  4. Pingback: Do Children Get Bad Backs? : The Blogsite for Penrith Chiropractic