Heatstroke, Hot Dogs & Cool Cats: How to Keep Pets Safe with First Aid

A funny image of a thirsty Boxer crossbreed with a very long tongue sticking out

Dogs pant to cool off. All images courtesy of DepositPhotos.com

Fun in the sun can quickly turn to tragedy if pet owners don’t take precautions to prevent cat and dog heatstroke. Pet heatstroke is common because cats and dogs can’t effectively keep cool in hot summer weather.

Cats and dogs can’t sweat to cool off. For hot dogs, normal panting provides a rapid exchange of cool outside air, and evaporation off the tongue keeps dog temperature normal.

Cats typically don’t pant–they lick and groom themselves and the evaporation off of their fur helps keep them cool. If you see your kitty panting in hot weather, that’s a danger sign that your cool cat is too darn hot!

Beautiful Persian cat with white fur and gree-blue eyes

Brachycephalic breeds like Persians and Pugs have a harder time cooling off because of shortened airways that interfere with effective panting.

Some breeds are more at risk. Dogs and cats with smooshed in faces like Pugs, Bulldogs, and Persians have a harder time cooling off even with panting. And when the outside air is the same or greater than pet’s normal body temperature  of 101 to 102.5 degrees, deadly heat stroke develops.

Cars and Heat Stroke

Cars become deathtraps in even relatively mild temperatures. On a 78-degree day, a shaded car reaches temperatures of 90 degrees but if parked in the sun, it will reach 160 degrees in minutes.

Leaving the car and air conditioning running is no guarantee of safety. Even extra protection can fail. On July 16, 2003, a Kansas City paper reported that K-9 Officer “Hondo,” a German shepherd dog, died of heatstroke after being left in the still-running air-conditioned police cruiser. The safety system, called a “Hotdog System” designed to protect K-9 officers failed to turn on the sirens, open the windows and turn on the fan when temperatures inside the cruiser reached dangerous levels.

Today, one of the most modern available for police dog safety is the computerized Hot-N-Pop system able to sense when the interior of the vehicle has become too hot for the K9 officer. When that happens, the system automatically rolls down the rear windows (windows have metal screens to prevent the dog from jumping out) and activates large window fans that bring in fresh air to help cool the dog. The Hot-N-Pop also activates the car’s emergency lights and horn, as well as sending a signal to a pager worn by the canine handler.

Dog sticking his head out of a car window

Open windows probably won’t significantly reduce the heat for your dog–it can still be a deathtrap!

Of course, most pet parents don’t have a Hot-N-Pop system. So what do you do if you see a pet closed up in a car? I know the first impulse is to break the glass yourself, but you may not have the ability or resources to do that. Use your phone–call animal control or dial 911. These folks have the authority not only to enter someone’s car, but also offer life saving first aid. Also, go inside the nearest business–often a post office or grocery–and get the folks there to announce over the intercom for the pet’s person to get back to the car ASAP. Then stay with the care until you confirm that help has arrived.

Symptoms of Heat Stroke

Symptoms of mild heatstroke are body temperature of 104 to 106 degrees, bright red tongue and gums, thick sticky saliva, and rapid panting. When body temperatures go above 106 degrees, the pet’s gums become pale, he acts dizzy, bleeds from the nose or has bloody vomiting and diarrhea, and ultimately becomes comatose. These pets can develop disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) where the red blood cells blow up and can’t carry oxygen.

DogIceBagThermometerHot_41710243_originalPet First Aid for Heat Stroke

Getting the temperature down to 104 degrees or less is more important than rushing the pet to the emergency clinic—but severe cases DO need veterinary attention once you give first-aid. Rectal thermometers usually only register as high as 108 degrees and pets with severe heatstroke may have a body temperature that goes off the end and reaches 110 or higher.

For mild heatstroke, bring your puppy into an air-conditioned space and turn on a fan, so the outside temperature is lower than his body temperature and panting can work. Offer ice cubes to lick, or cold Gatorade or Pedialyte or water to drink, and wrap him in cold wet towels.

For severe heatstroke, soak the pet with cold water from the hose, or in the tub or sink. Place ice packs (bags of frozen peas work well) in his “armpit” and groin region where there are major blood vessels. The cold will chill the blood, and as it circulates, will cool the whole body from the inside.

Pets with temperatures at or above 107 degrees need a cold-water enema for even quicker cooling. Use a turkey baster or a contact lens solution bottle filled with ice water if you don’t have an enema bag. Grease the tip with petroleum jelly, K-Y or vegetable oil and insert the tip into the rectum and squeeze gently to fill the cavity with fluid. Once his temperature drops to 104, wrap him up in a towel and get him to the emergency room.

It’s even better to prevent heatstroke in pets by providing shade and lots of cool water, or simply keeping pets inside. NEVER leave pets unattended in cars—that’s just asking for disaster. The ASPCA urges everyone to take the PLEDGE to Save Pet Lives this summer.

Have you ever seen dogs or cats left in hot cars? What did you do? How do you keep your fur-kids cool and safe during summer? Are there fav hot-weather-games they enjoy? Do tell!

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered–click the banner, above. Be sure to visit my PetHealthyStore for paw-some products for your furry wonders! Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, and get a FREE BOOK when you sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways, kewl product offers, and appearances related to my THRILLERS WITH BITE!

#FoodShelterLove Celebrates Adopt A Shelter Cat Month

ShelterKitten

“Please take meowwweeeeee HOME!” Image copr. Amy Shojai, CABC

This post is sponsored by Hill’s. I am being compensated for helping spread the word about Hill’s® Food, Shelter, & Love® Program, but BLING, BITCHES & BLOOD only shares information we feel is relevant to our readers. Hill’s Pet Nutrition, Inc. is not responsible for the content of this article.

Spring has sprung, and the birds and bees (and other critters) celebrate this time of year in typical creative fashion, with a bumper crop in animal shelters of needy adult cats and adoptable kittens. June is the purr-fect time to celebrate national Adopt-A-Shelter-Cat Month, and Hill’s® Food, Shelter, & Love® Program helps shelters give these furry waifs a great start in life.

HillsHealtyDevelopment

Image courtesy of Hill’s Pet Care

Since 2002, the Hill’s® Food, Shelter & Love® program has donated over $280 million worth of Science Diet brand foods to nearly 1,000 animal shelters, helping over 8 million pets find a new home…and counting. Healthy pets are more adoptable pets and all pets deserve proper, balanced nutrition. The Program also provides a free bag of Science Diet® pet food or a $5 off coupon to the pet parent for each adoption to further ensure a smooth and easy transition for pets to their new
home.

Kitten & Cat Adoption–How to Choose?

Boy or girl? Fluffy longhaired or short-and-svelte coat? Does color matter? What about age? Today there are cats available to suit every taste and circumstance. For a lifetime of love, use both your head and your heart to do some kitty match-making so your lifestyle fits the cat of your dreams, and vice versa.

shelter-kittens

Even siblings can look very different, and include longhair, shorthair, and a variety of color coats and patterns. Image copr. Amy Shojai, CABC

It’s kitten season, and nothing beats a kitten for cute-icity! There’s no doubt you’ll find your pick of the kitty litters right now. These pictures were taken at a local kitten adoption event, and there were FIVE TIMES the number of furry waifs you see here.

Kittens and cats often choose us. Rather than picking the “prettiest” baby, try this: Sit on the floor quietly in the adoption room, and let the kittens come to you. Roll a wad of paper to see which one pounces (or hides). You want the Christopher Columbus Kitten eager to explore new things–s/he will be healthier and less prone to stress compared to a Shrinking Violet kitten. And of course, get a vet check asap–you want to see bright clean eyes, clean fur, ears and bottom, and playful energy.

While kittens can be non-stop fun, they’re also works-in-progress–and you cannot accurately predict adult temperament. Most kittens love to lap-sit, but many outgrow this behavior. So if you want a lifelong feline lap-snuggler, choose an adult cat with an established personality so you know what you’re getting. You’ll already know that the cat likes or dislikes dogs, other cats, children, lap-sitting, and playing.

ShelterKittens2

Many shelters offer a discount for adopting pairs of kittens. Instant friendship! and they’ll target each other instead of your ankles, win-win for everyone! Image copr. Amy Shojai, CABC

Short fur sheds just as much as the long fluffy kind, but won’t tangle or require as much care on your part. Those longhaired beauties like Persians need combing every single day.

All kinds of speculation abounds regarding behaviors associated with coat color or pattern. None of it has been proven one way or another. However, it is a cat “rule” that dark fur lands on light-colored clothing while light fur magnetically attaches to dark trousers. When a cat has both light and dark fur, like my Seren, owners learn to live with hair and consider it a condiment.

hidingCat

Be prepared for cats to act different once you bring them home. Give shy kitties time to adjust. Image copr. Amy Shojai, CABC

Boy cats tend to grow bigger than girl cats, but as long as they’re spayed or neutered (you’ll want to do this!), the behaviors tend to be similar. Intact males want to baptize everything with sprays of urine, and intact girl cats bring more furry babies into this world after yowling and pestering owners to death.

KarmaHome

Sure, the youngest kittens may have cute-appeal, but don’t overlook older kittens or even adults. This is Karma, a few days after he arrived–at 8 months old, he probably wouldn’t have been chosen if at a shelter, since he was “so old.” Image copr. Amy Shojai, CABC

Age matters. While space concerns force shelters to adopt out kittens as early as possible, a cat will have far fewer behavior problems if he stays with mom-cat and siblings until at least twelve weeks old. If you adopt a kitten younger than this, you should either have a friendly adult cat in the house prepared to teach Junior how to be a proper cat–or you yourself must attempt to give these lessons. Cats learn from watching other cats how to groom themselves, use the litter box, scratch the right object, and inhibit clawing and biting during play. Humans fall short as teachers.

Lovely adult cats often get overlooked, but they’ve already learned these basic lessons and make outstanding pets. Due to the overload of animals, too many shelters have arbitrary age limits for euthanasia. Cats aged five and above may be euthanized automatically, even though they could be expected to provide a decade or more of companionship to a loving human owner.

SerenOnLap

Seren was non-stop fun when she arrived at 4 months old. I never would have imagined we’d still have her–now at age 18! and these last 10 years have been the sweetest of all. Image copr. Amy Shojai, CABC

Older cats tend to be more sedate than kittens, and less inclined to climb curtains, attack toes, or conduct gravity experiments by knocking breakables off high spots. At the shelter, don’t expect adult cats to “sell themselves” the way a kitten would. Remember that they’ve likely just lost their home, are scared and sad, and wondering what they did to make a beloved human go away. They need people to take a second look.

Every Christmas, I received emails and phone cals from folks looking for holiday kittens–at a time of year when furry babies are scarce. Now’s the time to look since a bumper crop abounds and you’ll be saving a life by adopting a cat.

SleepyKarma

“Happily ever after….” Image copr. Amy Shojai, CABC

You don’t need to wait for Adopt-A-Shelter-Cat Month. Wonderful candidates of all shapes, ages, and sizes wait for you at area shelters all year long. Nineteen years ago, my cat Seren showed up on a friend’s back porch, and purred her way into my heart. And a year ago, Karma-Kat decided to adopt our Magical-Dawg when he tried to dig his way through the patio window. May you be as lucky as my family to find the cat (or three) of your dreams!

FoodShelterLover

Image courtesy of Hill’s Pet Care

Does your shelter work with the Food, Shelter & Love Program? Use this link to find a shelter partner in your area!

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me onFacebook, and get a FREE BOOK when you sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways, and appearances related to my THRILLERS WITH BITE!

NAME THAT DOG & NAME THAT CAT! VOTE Your Pet Name for New Thriller

Show_Tell(1)I am blown away by the response to the call for pet name nominations to star in my next thriller SHOW AND TELL. After sending out the request in my Pet Peeves newsletter, I also posted here on the blog and shared via social media and various email lists.

There were a total of 46 dog names suggested, and (wait for it…) 81 cat names suggested. Wow! Some of y’all nominated a name for a specific dog or cat character, while others simply suggested names without a preference.

For simplicity’s sake, though, I’ve had to limit each character/poll to no more than 15 names (sorry!). I tried to include at least one name from each person (some of y’all offered several nominations), and avoid those too similar/already used for human characters. Stay tuned–because I have saved all the suggestions and have planned a special tie-in to include even more pet names. Because after all, EVERY pet is a star!

So without further delay, here are the lists. Feel free to vote for up to 3 in each category, and share this post to encourage your friends to campaign for your dog or cat name. I’ll leave the polls open until July 1st, and announce the winners on July 4th.

So feel free to share this everywhere and campaign for your top picks. The winning names not only will be included in the book, but your name and real pet’s description will be added to the “fact or fiction” acknowledgements in the book, and I’ll send you a paw-tographed copy of the book as soon as it comes out.

I’ve only included the suggested names and brief description (if offered) but if you want to review more details check out the comments on this blog post. Sorry, some came to me privately so can’t share beyond what’s on the poll for those…

But to THANK YOU for voting, scroll on down to the end for links to a couple of free E-books available June 24-26. Ready–set–VOTE!

couple of juvenile American Staffordshire terrier in front of a white background

Images courtesy of DepositPhotos.com

NAME THAT DOG!

Two “hog hunting” dogs that belong to BeeBo (from the HIDE AND SEEK book). They are adult Pit Bull (or pit mix). These dogs (one girl, one boy) adore each other. Vote for up to THREE of the following choices:


 

A beautiful female four year old apricot color English Mastiff dog laying down against a white backdrop

The third dog is a 200-pound Mastiff, lovely docile but powerful dog (and a drooler). Again, vote for up to THREE of your faves.


 

A large group of common dogs of different breeds that are various sizes

Dog that belongs to Willie Combs, the young son of Detective Jeff Combs. The dog loves to dig and is a fence escape artist addicted to chasing rabbits and squirrels, and of a size that September can carry him/her for a short time. Choose your top THREE favorite names.


 

kitten standing up meowing - five weeks old

NAME THAT CAT!

A young rescue kitten, found with a murder victim. It has typical kitten antics and can be any breed or look, and will be the key to catching the bad guy. Choose up to THREE of your favorite names.


 

Nine cat heads looking at the camera

One of the stolen pets, small enough to fit inside Willie’s jacket and be carried—so could be a small adult or an older kitten, any look/breed. Choose up to THREE of the following names.


 

A little funny scottish fold kitten is hanging on the rope. isolated on a white background

The third is an adult stolen pet cat, a shoulder perching, Tarzan-leaping, rope climbing maniac cat and can be any age, any breed/look. This kitty will help September and Shadow escape a trap. Pick your top THREE of the following names.


FREE FOR THREE DAYS ONLY

JUNE 24-26!

DogHatesDate CatHatesDateMy Cat Hates My Date

My Dog Hates My Date

 

 

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered–click the banner, above. Be sure to visit my PetHealthyStore for paw-some products for your furry wonders! Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me onFacebook, and get a FREE BOOK when you sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways, kewl product offers, and appearances related to my THRILLERS WITH BITE!

AAHA: THE STANDARD OF VETERINARY EXCELLENCE

Female professional veterinarian doctor examining a mixed breed dog that is wearing a plastic medical protective cone around her neck

Image Courtesy of DepositPhotos.com

While I was at the BlogPaws conference last month, I attended a special session sponsored by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA.org). Having previously worked as a vet tech, I’m familiar with this organization and learned even more during the presentation by Dr. Heather Loenser. If you’re not familiar with this wonderful organization, here’s what you need to know.

What Is AAHA?

The American Animal Hospital Association, founded 82 years ago, is a voluntary accrediting organization for small animal hospitals in the United States. That’s right…accreditation is VOLUNTARY, and it is not required by law. Only 12-15% of animal hospitals have gone through the rigorous and stringent evaluation process to attain this distinction.

That’s not to say that animal hospitals without AAHA-accreditation don’t offer great care from talented and dedicated veterinarians. Dr. Loenser noted that to achieve accreditation requires cooperation and dedication from the entire staff, from veterinarians and technicians to front desk staff and everyone who has a “paw” in the success of the practice.

It’s not particularly easy to achieve AAHA accreditation, or to maintain it. So when you see the red logo on your hospital door, website or their educational materials, you know they’ve gone the extra mile. These folks hold themselves to a higher standard.

Once accredited by AAHA, the animal hospital gets reevaluated every three years, measured against 900 standards. Some of these standards are mandatory, while others have a bit of wiggle room depending on circumstances.

For example, having a single-use surgery and ventilated isolation area are mandatory. hospital design can vary quite a bit depending on the location, type of building, size of practice and other parameters that are not so black and white.

A few of the other standards include issues related to medical records and even mentoring new graduates, as well as pain management, dentistry, radiology, infectious diseases, anesthesia and surgery. You can see some of these AAHA-recommended guidelines online, too.

Young female veterinarian with a cat in her arms

Image courtesy of DepositPhotos.com

Value Added Information

AAHA also lists 27 position statements covering everything from analgesics and dangerous animal legislation to declawing, animals in research, wild animals as pets, and THIS:

The American Animal Hospital Association supports the concept of animals as SENTIENT BEINGS. Sentiency is the ability to feel, perceive or be conscious, or to have subjective experiences. Biological science, as well as common sense, supports the fact that the animals that share our lives are feeling, sensing beings that deserve thoughtful, high-quality care. The care that is offered should provide for the animal’s physical and behavioral welfare and strive to minimize pain, distress, and suffering for the animal.

For pet parents of human kids, there’s a “just for kids” section, too. Check out the resources for teaching dog bite awareness and safety, as well as helping kids (and yourself, perhaps) through the loss of a special pet. Be sure to check out the AAHA Pet Owner resources section, too.

Is My Vet Hospital Accredited?

aahalogoMy veterinary hospital has a website, and on the “about” page it includes the AAHA logo and says this:

“We voluntarily sought accreditation by the American Animal Hospital Association. This means that we regularly have our practice evaluated by an expert to ensure that we comply with veterinary care standards. And it means that you can be sure your pet is receiving the best possible care, using the latest procedures and technology. Ask us about our AAHA accreditation and how it affects your pet.”

You can also check the AAHA-Accredited Vet Hospital Locator and do a search to see if your vet–or a clinic in your neck of the woods–is listed. If you’re moving to a new home, this is also a great way to help you find your ideal veterinary clinic, one that’s focused on compassionate care and that puts your pets first, just like you do.

If you don’t see the AAHA logo, why not ask about it? Maybe your hospital IS accredited and will make more of an effort to let clients know, when they know how much we care. Educated pet parents and clients make the best advocates for their companion animals, and your veterinarians want to know how much you care. In fact, your interest may be all that’s needed for your clinic to seek accreditation.

Now then…post in the comments. Is your veterinary hospital AAHA-accredited? Do tell!

Note: I was not compensated for this post, and AAHA is not responsible for the content of this blog. From time to time, when I feel information about a cause, product, company or organization is so important for the well being of our special animal companions and those who love them, I simply must share. Opinions expressed are my own.

Stay tuned–the VOTE comes this week for NAME THAT DOG and NAME THAT CAT!

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered–click the banner, above. Be sure to visit my PetHealthyStore for paw-some products for your furry wonders! Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me onFacebook, and get a FREE BOOK when you sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways, kewl product offers, and appearances related to my THRILLERS WITH BITE!

Why Dogs Vomit: How to Treat Puppy Vomiting At Home

Dog falls asleep in the arms of a stuffed toy. isolated on whiteDog and puppy vomiting can be very dangerous for your pet, and while we don’t like to talk about it, pet vomit is a fact of life. Dogs tend to vomit more readily than almost all other animals. (The cats just started snickering . . . )

Puppy Vomiting & Dog Regurgitation

There are many reasons why your dog vomits, from innocuous to potentially deadly. Vomiting is the forcible expulsion of the stomach’s contents up the dog’s throat and out of the mouth. However, you should be aware that vomiting is different than regurgitation.

Regurgitation is a passive process without strong muscle contractions. Regurgitation can occur minutes to hours after your pet eats his food, and the expelled material is undigested and may even be tube-shaped like the throat. Cats fed cold canned food may “whoops” it back up very quickly, or dogs that gulp and swallow too fast may regurgitate their food. Mom canids in the wild do this when they return from hunting, in order to feed their pups.

Occasional regurgitation isn’t a cause for concern unless it interferes with nutrition and what you feed your pet. Chronic regurgitation typically is seen in a young puppy. In these cases, regurgitation can cause slow growth, and may be due to a physical problem like megasophagus.

How to Make Dogs Vomit

In cases of poisoning or swallowing dangerous objects, you may need to induce vomiting. Learning how to make puppies vomit can save his life.

  1. Give him some food to dilute the poison, delay its absorption, and for solid objects, may also pad any rough edges. It can be tough to get puppies to upchuck if the tummy is too empty.
  2. Give 3% hydrogen peroxide with an eyedropper, syringe without a needle or even a squirt gun or turkey baster. It tastes nasty and foams, and that combination usually prompts vomiting in about five minutes. You can repeat this dose two or three times, with five minutes between doses.
  3. Syrup of Ipecac is effective for dogs. Ipecac takes longer to work than hydrogen peroxide, though, and the dose should only be given once. Give one teaspoon for dogs less than 35 pounds, and up to a tablespoon for larger dogs.
  4. When nothing else is handy, you can try giving table salt prompts dry, onto the back of the puppy’s tongue. Only give one teaspoonful at a time for little pups or a tablespoonful for adults. Repeat in three minutes if the first dose doesn’t work.
  5. Call the veterinarian for further instructions after the pet has emptied his stomach. If you can’t induce vomiting after a couple of tries, prompt veterinary care is even more important. In cases of suspected poison, take a sample of the vomit with you to the veterinarian to analyze and offer an antidote or other follow-up measures.

Why Dogs & Puppies Vomit

When the “vomit center” of the brain is stimulated, the puppy begins to salivate and swallow repeatedly. Your puppy may seek attention or look anxious. Then, the stomach and abdominal muscles forcibly and repeatedly contract, while at the same time the esophagus relaxes. The puppy extends her neck, opens her mouth and makes a strained gagging sound as the stomach empties.

Vomiting should never be considered normal. Most cases of adult dog vomiting result from gastric irritation due to swallowed grass, eating inedible objects, spoiled or rich food (raiding the garbage, table scraps) or simply eating too much too fast. You can prevent puppies from eating the wrong thing with these puppy proofing tips. Dogs and puppies also may vomit from motion sickness during car rides.

The most common cause of vomiting in dogs is gluttony. Dogs that gorge their food tend to lose it just as quickly, particularly if they exercise shortly after finishing a meal. This type of vomiting isn’t particularly dangerous, but is annoying.

Repeated vomiting, vomiting along with diarrhea, unproductive vomiting, vomiting not associated with eating, and/or the pooch acts like she feels bad before or after the event is a cause for alarm.

Vomiting can be a sign of canine distemper virus or canine parvovirus, which can be prevented by proper vaccinations. In deep chested breeds, unproductive vomiting may be a sign of bloat. Bloat (gastric dilatation and/or volvulus) happens with the stomach swells and potentially twists without emptying and can kill dogs very quickly–big deep chested dogs (German Shepherds like Magical-Dawg) are most prone.

If the vomit contains blood or fecal material, if it lasts longer than 24 hours, or if other signs such as diarrhea accompany the vomiting, contact your veterinarian immediately. For some types of vomiting, home care may be all that’s needed.

Treatment for Vomiting

Slowing down how fast your dog eats relieves mealtime vomiting. Feed in separate bowls to cut down on “competition” eating, or place a large non-swallowable ball in the dish so the dog is forced to eat around it. There now are some very cool “foraging bowls” that can help slow down the gulpers. Meal-feeding several times a day rather than once will also alleviate overeating. A few dogs vomit when they’re excited or fearful.

Vomiting that happens only once or twice isn’t a cause for concern as long as the puppy or dog acts normal before and after. Rest the digestive tract for 12 to 24 hours or so usually resolves the gastric irritation in older pups and adult dogs. But very young puppies and especially Toy-size breeds shouldn’t go without a meal for longer than about six to eight hours, though, so you’ll need vet help with tiny pups. These little guys also dehydrate very quickly which can complicate matters.

Pick up the food bowl and give only small amounts of water. Vomiting makes pups feel thirsty but drinking can upset the tummy even further. So offer water in a syringe every 15 or 20 minutes, or offer an ice cube for her to lick.

You can safely give Pepto-Bismol to manage doggy vomiting. It coats the stomach wall, soothes the upset and the bismuth absorbs bacterial toxins that prompt vomiting. The dose is about ½ to 1 teaspoon per 5 pounds of body weight up to three times a day.

Vomiting may be a sign of serious illness, though. Anytime your pet vomits three or more times in a single day, or two or more days in a row, you should take her to the vet.

What about you? Have your puppies or dogs ever had a scary/dangerous bout of vomiting? Magic got REALLY sick one time with explosive diarrhea and vomiting and turns out he’d caught a “bug” from drinking pond water.

PS: Don’t forget to enter the NAME THAT DOG and NAME THAT CAT contest and get your furry wonder featured in my next book! Entries close on Friday!

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered–click the banner, above. Be sure to visit my PetHealthyStore for paw-some products for your furry wonders! Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me onFacebook, and get a FREE BOOK when you sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways, kewl product offers, and appearances related to my THRILLERS WITH BITE!