National Breast Cancer Awareness Month For Pets Too!

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month for humans. I doubt that anyone in today’s world hasn’t been touched by this disease either personally or by knowing someone who has.

But did you know breast cancer also affects pets? And some of the research for people helps cats and dogs–and vice versa.

WHAT PETS ARE AFFECTED BY BREAST CANCER

Breast cancer accounts for half of the cases of canine cancer, and about 50 percent of canine breast tumors are malignant. High-risk breeds include the poodle, English spaniel, English setter and terriers, while low-risk breeds for mammary cancer include the boxer and Chihuahua. The older the dog, the greater the risk of tumors–you can learn more about canine cancers, diagnosis and treatment in both the aging dog book and also the cutting-edge medicine book.

Breast cancer is not as common in cats as in dogs, but it’s more deadly in felines. Nearly 90 percent of feline breast tumors are malignant. Male cats and dogs almost never get mammary cancer.

EARLY SIGNS OF PROBLEMS

In almost all cases, you will find the lump or bump on your cat or dog while petting her. Breast exams, particularly for older female cats and dogs, are a great idea because they can detect lumps and bumps very early. Survival time depends on the size of the tumor when first treated. The smaller the tumor when treated, the better the chance your pet will do well.

Therefore, it’s extremely important to have your veterinarian evaluate potential problems immediately. Never settle for a “wait and see” approach—that gives the cancer more time to grow and spread, and reduces the chance of a good treatment outcome. Isn’t it better to find out that your dog’s lump was nothing to worry about, than to discover too late that it’s cancer and no longer treatable?

BREAST CANCER TREATMENT IN PETS

The standard treatment for mammary tumors is surgical mastectomy (removal) of the affected glands. That may be a single breast, or multiple breasts (usually) on one side of the abdomen. Your regular veterinarian may be able to perform this surgery, or you may wish to contact a veterinary oncologist.

Sometimes chemotherapy is suggested in addition to the surgery if not all of the tumor can be removed and/or if it has already spread. Some veterinary cancer specialists recommend using chemotherapy first to help shrink the tumor before it is surgically removed. Please remember that cats and dogs don’t lose their hair, and rarely feel sick during chemotherapy treatment. Pets don’t even know they’re sick, so they don’t become upset just at the mention of the “C-WORD” that fills people with terror.

PREVENTING PET TUMORS–YES, YOU CAN!

Unlike some other cancers where a roll of the dice seems to decide who will be affected, mammary cancer can be prevented—or the risk drastically reduced—in our pets. Spaying female dogs before their first heat cycle will nearly eliminate the risk. Intact (un-spayed) dogs will have seven times greater chance of developing mammary cancer.

Cats benefit from spaying prior to first heat, too, and spaying before 6 months gives cats 91 percent lower risk compared to unaltered cats. There’s still a benefit to spaying up until two years (about 11 percent less risk), but if you wait any longer the incidence of mammary tumors is the same as unaltered cat. Siamese cats have two times greater risk of developing breast cancer than other cats, and at a younger age.

Cancer tends to be a disease of aging pets. My cat Seren is both a Siamese, and now a senior citizen, so I am particularly vigilant. Starting this month, I hope everyone will pay more attention to their cats and dogs, starting with breast exams. I promise, your pet will thank you for the extra tummy rub.

Have your pets been touched by cancer? Often I’m told the dogs and cats who go through this prove to be inspirational to their human families, living in the moment and still finding joy despite health challenges. What advice would you offer pet lovers who must face such trials?

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered? Do you have a new kitten and need answers? Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, listen to the weekly radio show, check out weekly FREE PUPPY CARE newsletter, and sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways and appearances related to my  THRILLERS WITH BITE!

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